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Benefis Health System Foundation

Addressing Perinatal Substance Use Disorders in Cascade County and Montana Northern Tribes

Grant Term: 24 months; 2018-2020
Grant Amount: $150,000

Benefis Hospital, together with community agencies, will work to reduce the adverse outcomes of perinatal drug and alcohol use for newborns and their families through supportive, team-based care and better coordination between health care providers and social service agencies. Benefis will implement SBIRT (screening, brief intervention, and referral to care) as a routine part of perinatal care and develop a system of care coordination for pregnant women who are identified through routine screening. The hospital will invite and engage outside providers to implement a similar model of team-based care throughout the community, and partnerships with outside social service agencies and neighboring tribes will be established throughout the course of the project. Grants funding will be used to support the project coordinator position.

Blackfeet Tribal Health

The Perinatal Behavioral Health Project

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021
Grant Amount: $150,000

Blackfeet Tribal Health will partner with the Indian Health Service (IHS) Blackfeet Community Hospital to create a community-wide system of care to address substance use and mental illness for pregnant women and their families. Addressing perinatal substance use is a top community health priority for Blackfeet with a high fraction of babies born screening positive for substances. Grant funds will be used to hire a care coordinator and behavioral health specialist to work with the Blackfeet IHS OB Department and the Blackfeet Medication-Assistant Treatment Program to serve all perinatal patients. This project will bring together many of the tribal social service agencies together to collaborate and ensure services are provided to address social issues the families are facing.

Bozeman Health Foundation

The Perinatal Substance Abuse in Southwest Montana Project

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021
Grant Amount: $110,000

This project will allow Bozeman Health to develop and implement an effective model of care for OB/GYN patients who have behavioral health needs. Through this project, Bozeman Health will integrate behavioral health provides into their current care teams and expand the model of team-based care to partners in the community. Grant funds will be used to add additional behavioral health providers, who will be available for warm hand-offs and same day visits, into existing care teams who care for pregnant women. Partners include Gallatin County Health Department and Roots Family Cooperative who will assist in addressing social needs of women and families. The project’s overall goal is to improve timely access to effective evidenced based care to help serve women and families that are affected by drug and alcohol use or mental health issues during the most crucial time of development. 

Community Hospital of Anaconda

The Reducing Adverse Outcomes of Perinatal Substance Use Disorder Project

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021
Grant Amount: $150,000

This project will allow the Community Hospital of Anaconda (CHA) implement a comprehensive, team-based, family inclusive continuum of care for perinatal patients with substance use disorders and mental health issues. As part of the project, CHA will build on its existing infrastructure to integrate behavioral health services into prenatal care. It will also work with community partners to addresses the accompanying social needs, including transportation, food insecurity, housing, employment, and social support. Grant funds will be used primarily for staff support and to hire a licensed clinical social worker to help implement the program. Partnerships include associate primary care clinics and local behavioral health agencies. The project’s overall goal is to reduce barriers to treatment for pregnant women and their families struggling with substance use disorders and mental illness and increase access to social support.

Community Medical Center

Improving Screening and Treatment for Perinatal Drug Use in Missoula

Grant Term: 24 months; 2018-2020
Grant Amount: $150,000

For this project, Community Medical Center (CMC) will work to improve the quality of care for pregnant women and infants affected by substance use disorders in Missoula County. In collaboration with Partnership Health Center, Saint Patrick’s Hospital, and community groups serving pregnant women, this project’s goal is to reduce the stigma that prevents many women with substance use disorders from seeking help. As a part of the project, obstetric offices will standardize screening and care for women with substance use disorders and partner with community organizations to provide referrals to addiction support services. As a part of the project, CMC’s mother-baby unit will institute a program to engage parents as partners in the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome after birth. This approach will train parents to use evidence-based, non-pharmacologic methods to soothe withdrawal symptoms in babies. The goal of this approach is to improve mother-infant bonding, strengthen families, decrease pharmacologic treatment and long hospital stays, and decrease foster care placements in Missoula County. Grant funds will be used for personnel expenses, staff training, and communications and marketing materials.

Florence Crittenton

Substance Abuse Treatment for Pregnant and Parenting Women

Project Term: 18 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $75,000

This project allowed the grantee to plan and implement outpatient substance abuse services for Florence Crittenton’s clientele, and to explore residential treatment options for pregnant and parenting women and their children. Florence Crittenton received licensing as a Level 3.3 Recovery Home for Women and Children ages 18 to 35 and became a state approved provider for outpatient substance use disorder services for families of all ages. They also applied for and received a mental health center license, allowing them to provide services for co-occurring disorders. Finally, they developed a process for documenting and billing for services provided which will ensure the long-term financial viability of these new programs.

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies

Building Bridges for Better Births

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $25,000

The goal of this planning grant was to learn about what communities in Montana are doing to address substance use and mental illness in pregnancy and to explore the need for the formation of a statewide coalition to strengthen and improve services provided to pregnant women and their families. Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies successfully completed site visits to 12 communities and strong support for moving forward with a statewide coalition was demonstrated throughout the course of the project.

Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies

Building Bridges for Better Births

Project Term: 24 months; 2018-2020
Grant Amount: $68,000

For this project, Healthy Mothers Healthy Babies (HMHB) will work with statewide partners to coordinate community coalitions focused on implementing evidence-based integrated behavioral health models to treat perinatal substance use disorders. This work aligns closely with MHCF’s Solving Perinatal Drug and Alcohol Use Initiative, and, as part of this project, HMHB will partner with the foundation to plan for and convene two meetings that will allow for presentation and coordination of statewide efforts to successfully treating perinatal substance use disorders and decrease the number of infants born exposed to drugs in Montana.

Helena OB/GYN and Associates

Go Mom Go

Project Term: 24 months; 2018-2020
Grant Amount: $150,000

Helena OB/GYN and Associates and community partners organizations will collectively develop a program that supports mothers and mothers-to-be in Lewis and Clark County. The genesis of the program is to provide a proactive, integrated behavioral health and community-based care delivery model for pregnant women and those exposed to perinatal drug use. Community outreach and a marketing plan will also be developed throughout the course of this project. Key partnerships include Saint Peter’s Hospital, Florence Crittendon Home, and Helena Indian Alliance.

Kalispell Regional Healthcare

Post-Delivery Support for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Infants and Their Parents

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $50,000

Through this grant, Kalispell Regional Healthcare’s (KRH) neonatal intensive care unit staff worked with Montana hospitals to develop and implement a standardized protocol to screen for and manage drug withdrawal in newborns. The grant resulted in several important accomplishments: 1) The grantee developed an educational video for staff using the Modified Finnegan Scoring Tool to assess infants exposed to opiates in utero. 2) The implementation of a new “incentivized parenting program” that fostered a cultural shift away from blaming mothers for their addiction and toward a sympathetic, supportive attitude that encouraged parents to participate in care of their infants and to engage in education and treatment activities; 3) The NICU improved cooperation with state agencies to support families. An independent evaluation of the program suggested that these accomplishments helped reduce foster care placement of infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). The prevalence of foster care placement for babies with NAS decreased from 75% (N = 12) in 2015 to 11.1% (N = 9) in 2017 (partial). Continuing an earlier trend, the average length of hospital stays for NAS-affected babies went from 23.5 days (average 2014-2015) to 14.9 days (N = 9) in 2017 (partial).

Kalispell Regional Medical Center: Pathways Treatment Center

Integrated Behavioral Healthcare for High Risk Pregnant Women

Project Term: 24 months; 2017-2019
Grant Amount: $150,000

With consultation from the National Council for Behavioral Health, this project will integrate behavioral health services into obstetrics (OB) care at Kalispell Regional Medical Center. Once implemented, behavioral health screening, diagnosis, and treatment will be fully integrated into the OB clinical care, and provided to mothers as part of standard prenatal care practice. Grant funding will be used to hire a OB behavioral health care coordinator who will offer behavioral health and substance use disorder screenings and treatment to at-risk mothers, develop and implement a fully integrated system of care in the OB clinic, and make necessary referrals to community based care after birth.

 

Livingston HealthCare Foundation

The Perinatal Behavioral Health and Substance Use Treatment Pathway Project

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021
Grant Amount: $81,265

This project will allow Livingston Healthcare (LHC) to reduce the adverse outcomes of perinatal behavioral health conditions for mothers, newborns, and their families in the Park County region. The project will do this by developing team-based, early intervention and coordinated care between LHC providers and local resources and agencies. Grant funds will be primarily used to develop care pathways to address substance use and mental health referrals, staff training, and marketing and outreach services. Partnerships include the Park County Health Department and Community Health Partners. The project’s overall goal is to increase the number of women in the community who receive appropriate prenatal care, increase the number of perinatal patients who receive behavioral health and substance use disorder treatment, decrease crisis encounters for this population, and decrease incidences of children removed from families due to guardian substance abuse.

Mountain Home Montana

Substance Use Disorder Treatment for Pregnant and Parenting Teens

Project Term: 18 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $73,754

This planning project worked to develop a strategy for integrating substance use disorder treatment into Mountain Home Montana’s wrap-around care for pregnant and parenting mothers. Over the course of the project, Mountain Home Montana expanded and deepened partnerships with providers and strengthened their referral network and processes to better serve young families struggling with substance abuse. They successfully provided robust staff training around substance use disorder issues and levels of treatment, clarified referral processes, and hired an in-house therapist who is also a licensed addictions counselor. Mountain Home also obtained a Medicaid youth endorsement, which allows billing for case management and therapeutic services for clients under age 18 and they adopted an evidence-based evaluation tool to measure their program’s successes and challenges. As a direct result of policy shifts for substance use disorder treatment, staff training, and capacity, Mountain Home was able to reduce evictions from their residential program due to substance abuse from 20% to 6%. Beyond these direct results, Mountain Home also leveraged this planning grant into a five-year award from the federal Family and Youth Services Bureau to support residential programs.

Providence Montana Health Foundation

The Wrapped in Hope Project

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $100,000

The Wrapped in Hope Project was a collaboration between Providence Montana Health Foundation and Saint Joseph Hospital, with strong support from the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal government, to implement a multi-disciplinary approach to drug use during pregnancy through both clinical and home-based services. Both hospitals implemented collaborative, team-based approaches that provide holistic, respectful, family-centered care. They also hired licensed clinical social workers with expertise in addictions to provide care and coordinate supportive services for pregnant women struggling with addiction. A second component of the program focused on community outreach encouraging women to seek care in early pregnancy and informing them of available supportive services (materials below). This project achieved significant accomplishments both on the programmatic and community change level, including:

  • Women struggling with substance abuse while pregnant can now go to any health care provider in the Mission Valley and receive non-judgmental, quality health care, recovery support, and referrals.
  • Because of the project’s partnership efforts, local health care professionals have an increased knowledge and awareness about neonatal abstinence syndrome, the importance of working with Child Protective Services, motivational interviewing, pain and opioids, and other relevant topics impacting pregnancy and addiction.
  • This project has created and sustained a model of community collaboration for addressing the public health crisis of women and their babies impacted by substance abuse during pregnancy.

Project Materials:

Providence Montana Health Foundation

The Bridge to Hope Project

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $42,600

This project worked to support mothers and families with newborns experiencing Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) on the Flathead Reservation. This project was designed to reduce the rate of maternal-infant separation in the hospital setting as a result of NAS treatment, engage addicted mothers in the care of their infant through support group sessions, and increase addicted mothers’ voluntary participation in area drug treatment programs by the time of their infants’ discharge. The project successfully achieved its objectives and developed a model that has garnered the interest of other providers around the state. The program supported 40 infants per year resulting in 85% of infants involved in the program getting discharged home from the hospital with a biological caregiver. Maternal prenatal and postnatal substance use support resulted in 30% of mothers no longer using at the time of delivery and 20% of mothers involved in drug treatment programs. The project built new collaborative partnerships with Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribal Social Services, the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (MT DPHHS) Child and Family Services, the Montana Department of Justice Drug Endangered Children Task Force, and the Lake County Public Health Department, in addition to many non-profit organizations and community partners.

Providence Montana Health Foundation

A Collaborative Approach to Screening and Treatment of Perinatal Drug Use Disorders

Grant Term: 24 months; 2018-2020
Grant Amount: $150,000

For this project, Missoula’s Providence Saint Patrick Hospital (SPH) will implement a collaborative approach to screen for and treat perinatal drug use. The goal of this project is to provide holistic, non-judgmental care empowering women with skills and resources to successfully care for their newborns, especially those with neonatal abstinence syndrome. The hospital’s family maternity center and neurobehavioral health will partner with Western Montana Clinic’s obstetrics and gynecology providers to establish and implement a clinical care team that includes licensed behavioral health clinicians. At the community-level, partnerships will be established with the Missoula City-County Health Department, the neonatal abstinence syndrome workgroup, child protective services, and other appropriate agencies. Providence SPH and Community Medical Center will work collaboratively on educational and outreach efforts for staff and the community-at-large regarding the critical importance of addressing the impact of perinatal drug and alcohol use in Missoula. A central focus is provider education regarding the need for universal drug screening for all pregnant women in Missoula and the surrounding areas to improve health outcomes for mothers and their newborns. Grant funds will be primarily used for personnel including a behavioral health provider and childbirth educator.

Rimrock Foundation

Residential Treatment for Pregnant American Indian Women

Project Term: 24 months; 2017-2019
Grant Amount: $63,135

This project will help create Elm House, a residential treatment home for pregnant women struggling with addiction that will incorporate perinatal care with addiction treatment throughout the duration of the pregnancy. In partnership with St. Vincent Healthcare’s Provider Network’s Midwives, this treatment modality will promote long-term recovery, while the women receive the necessary obstetric care to decrease the occurrence of perinatal drug exposure and neonatal abstinence syndrome. Priority admission will be given to Northern Cheyenne and Crow patients referred through the work of previous MHCF grants to St. Vincent’s. In addition to treatment, women will receive case management services to ease into the transition to a safe sober living environment with their baby after delivery.

Rocky Mountain Tribal Epidemiology Center

Feasibility of Maintenance Therapy in Pregnancy among Opioid Users in Tribal Communities

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $25,000

This planning grant investigated the feasibility of providing medication-assisted treatment for women on the Blackfeet Reservation who are using opioids during pregnancy. This treatment is recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as an evidence-based standard of care because it can prevent maternal and fetal complications of opioid use and withdrawal, encourage prenatal care and drug treatment, and reduce social complications and criminal activity associated with addiction.

The grantee organized a conference on Blackfeet that was attended by more than 90 people. Speakers included clinicians from the Blackfeet Community Hospital, members of the Lummi Tribe, and a neonatologist from Kalispell Regional Medical Center. The conference and feedback from participants were used to generate a final report: Addressing Opioid Use in Pregnancy: Conversations and Next Steps in Blackfeet.

Following the conference, members of the Blackfeet Tribe visited the Lummi Opioid Prevention and Treatment Center in WA and were inspired to consider creating a similar program on Blackfeet. They formed an opioid prevention task force which includes employees of the Blackfeet Community Hospital, Silent Warriors, Blackfeet Tribal Health, Blackfeet Community College, and other stakeholders. This task force and their opioid prevention work will continue in 2017 with new foundation funding.

Rocky Mountain Tribal Epidemiology Center

From Plan to Action: Prevention and Support for Pregnant Blackfeet Women Using Opioids

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $75,000

In 2016, MHCF supported the Rocky Mountain Tribal Epidemiology Center and their Boston University-based partners to work with the Blackfeet Tribe and the Indian Health Service Blackfeet Community Hospital on early-stage planning work to address opioid use by pregnant women. The funds supported a conference hosted at the Blackfeet Community College, a detailed report and feedback, an inspirational Blackfeet visit to the Lummi tribe’s opioid maintenance program, and the formation of a new, multi-partner opioid prevention task force on Blackfeet.

This project continued this work through task force strengthening and capacity-building, focus groups/key informant interviews with clinicians and substance-using pregnant women, the production of a “gap analysis” to determine treatment shortfalls for substance-using pregnant women on Blackfeet, and the production of a feasibility analysis and business plan for developing services to address perinatal drug use. Ultimately, the project resulted in the coordination and development of a medication-assisted treatment (MAT) clinic for pregnant women and families on the Blackfeet Reservation. The grantee was also able to successfully secure additional funding to support further development of the project through the State of Montana STR grant and a Tribal Opioid Response grant which will supplement the services offered through the MAT clinic. A building on the Blackfeet Reservation was secured for the MAT clinic and a partnership was establish with Community Medical Services. Community Medical Services provides the induction and medication management services and Blackfeet Tribal Health provides the care coordination and behavioral health services for the women and families.

Saint James Healthcare Foundation

A Relational Model for Reducing Perinatal Substance Use Disorders in Southwest Montana

Grant Term: 24 months; 2018-2020
Grant Amount: $150,000

For this project, Saint James Healthcare (SJH), in partnership with a network of community partners, will work to prevent perinatal substance abuse and improve care and access for pregnant women struggling with substance use in Southwest Montana. The multidisciplinary community team includes SJH, Montana Chemical Dependency Center, Southwest Montana Community Health Center, the Butte-Silver Bow Health Department, the Southwest Region Child & Family Services, and the Butte Community Action Team. This program a relational model of care and education inclusive of behavioral health, consistent prenatal care, and care coordination to address social factors impeding treatment. As a key component, the program engages the father or significant partner within the sphere of care, treatment, and social support. The program seeks to reduce occurrences of substance use in pregnancy and specifically encourages a path to long-term recovery through early detection and intervention, accessible treatment, and increasing community awareness. SJH will create a clinical team consisting of a social worker/care coordinator, a licensed behavioral health provider and family medicine physicians and an obstetric provider. Grant funds will be used primarily to support personnel and facilitate travel.

Saint Peter's Health Foundation

The Reducing Adverse Outcomes of Perinatal Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders in the Greater Lewis and Clark County Area Project

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021
Grant Amount: $150,000

This project will help St. Peter’s Health (SPH) work to reduce the adverse outcomes of perinatal mental illness and substance use disorders. The project will do this through implementing screening, treatment, and referral protocols; expanding integrated behavioral health services within SPH OB provider clinics and the inpatient women and children’s unit; expanding nurse care coordination staff and support resources in the Helena community; and developing applicable data management and reporting capabilities. Grant funds will be used primarily for hiring a behavioral health specialist and a care coordinator to help implement and support the project. Partnerships include Helena OB/GYN who will work with SPH to develop a community wide approach including outreach and development of partnership with the Women’s Clinic of Helena and Helena pediatric clinics. The project’s overall goal is to reduce substance abuse and stabilize mental health disorders in the perinatal and postpartum populations and reduce the necessity of Child Protective Services intervention and foster care removals.

Saint Vincent Healthcare Foundation

Integrated Prenatal Care Model for Native American Women: Reducing Substance Abuse During Pregnancy

Project Term: 24 months; 2016-2018
Grant Amount: $150,000

This grant will provide case management and program coordination for pregnant Native American women struggling with addiction by developing a program that creates supportive, integrated access to perinatal care and addiction treatment. The program will support sobriety and provide evidence-based treatment during pregnancy to decrease the occurrence of neonatal abstinence syndrome and fetal alcohol syndrome, as well as to support a path to long-term recovery. The care coordinator position will be a part of the Northern Cheyenne Tribal Health Department. Key partners include the Northern Cheyenne Tribal Board of Health, Indian Health Service, and Rimrock Foundation. Expected outcomes include improved access to prenatal care and substance abuse services for pregnant Native women on and off the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, decreased substance abuse in pregnant women, and a reduction in negative birth outcomes and medical costs associated with drug use during pregnancy.

Saint Vincent Healthcare Foundation

Comprehensive Prenatal Care with Integrated Substance Abuse Treatment for American Indian Women

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2016
Grant Amount: $25,000

This planning grant resulted in a collaboration between the Northern Cheyenne Tribe and Saint Vincent Healthcare to establish a collaborative program to provide and coordinate care for pregnant women with substance use disorders. This tribally-led pilot program worked to increase early entry into prenatal care by refining a trusted model of care for prenatal care and integrate supportive services and substance abuse treatment. This work will continue with support from a new MHCF implementation grant.

 

Saint Vincent's Healthcare Foundation

Look Closer: Addressing Perinatal Behavioral Health in Eastern Montana

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2020
Grant Amount: $150,000

This project will help St. Vincent Healthcare increase access to mental health and substance use disorder care for pregnant women in Eastern MontanaThe project will do this by developing an integrated prenatal care program and expanding it to four additional OB sites affiliated with St. Vincent Healthcare and Riverstone Health Center. Grant funds will primarily be used for hiring a prenatal services liaison who will provide coordination to women in all participating sites. Partners include Rimrock Treatment Center and associated prenatal care providers in Eastern Montana (Billings OB/GYN Associates, St. Vincent’s West Grand Family Medicine, St. Vincent Maternal Fetal Medicine, St. Vincent’s Midwifery and Women’s Health, and RiverStone Health). The project’s overall goals are to increase the rates of women who receive prenatal care and substance use disorder screening, intervention, and treatment, and to reduce the rate of infants who are substance-exposed before birth.  

Western Montana Mental Health Center - Recovery Center Missoula

Recovery Center Missoula Pregnant and Parenting Women

Project Term: 24 months; 2017-2019
Grant Amount: $150,000

This project will increase substance use disorder and medication assisted treatment access for pregnant and post-partum women through creating residential treatment homes in Missoula and Lake County. The home in Missoula will be an expansion of Recovery Center Missoula’s home and will serve woman transitioning from inpatient care to residential treatment. The home in Lake County will begin offering treatment and supportive services for pregnant and parenting mothers struggling with addiction. Grant funding will be used for start-up costs and home upgrades.

YWCA of Helena

WINGS Re-Entry Transitional Housing Program

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $50,000

This project’s goal was to integrate a behavioral health clinician into the YWCA’s transitional women’s housing program and secure state approval for a level three sober living home for women and children, which would allow for a range of reimbursable services for behavioral health. Through this project, the YWCA successfully completed a building inspection, developed the policies and procedures, and planned for the programming that will be implemented once state approval is obtained. In the course of the project, the YWCA experienced a leadership turnover which created challenges in applying for state approval and this objective was ultimately not achieved. However, the YWCA did hire a behavioral health clinician, which was a major achievement in advancing programming and strategies and positions the organization to successfully obtain state approval in the future.

2019 Call for Proposals

Find out about this year’s available grants.