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Bighorn Valley Health Center

Feasibility Study for Itchik Diiawakaam Family Healing Center

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2019
Grant Amount: $49,350

The Bighorn Valley Health Center completed a feasibility study for establishing the Itchik Diiawakaam Family Healing Center within the Apsaalooke (Crow) Nation. The study determined that a supportive housing model could sustain the Healing Center if capital funds could be raised for construction costsThrough this project, the Healing Center received its 501(c)3 status. They plan to complete a business plan and conduct a capital campaign to raise funds to build the facility. The Healing Center will provide a program and facility that allows individuals and families to heal together in their community while immersed in Crow cultural values and support. The center’s focus on relational justice, foster care alternatives, integrative approaches to mental and physical health, meaningful work, trauma resolution, and indigenous models of education will serve as a blueprint for the exploration process. The center will be piloted in Lodge Grass on the Crow Indian Reservation, and residents will be engaged in all facets of program creation and implementation. Project partners include Lodge Grass City Government leadership and tribal community members.   

Bighorn Valley Health Center

Establishing A Structured Framework to Improve Sustained Health and Well-Being

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2019
Grant Amount: $25,000

The Bighorn Valley Health Center (BVHC) trained its leadership staff in the Lean Six Sigma Model. This model is an evidence-based quality and performance improvement methodology that is allowing BVHC to take a systematic approach to improving health care services. BVHC is expanding to increase access and services, merging with existing clinic sites to share expertise and resources, and extending outreach to develop community partnerships. The health center is engaging experts to train their teams to apply and practice Lean Six Sigma tools to ensure projects and workflows are well defined, measured, analyzed, improved, and controlled. This training allowed BVHC to complete six improvement projects that led to increased revenue and improved health outcomes for patients. The projects included Medicaid prior authorizations, forms standardization, travel reimbursements, closed chart notes, A1C testing, and implementation of a tool to screen for the social determinants of healthWith the additional staff trained in the Lean Six Sigma Model, BVHC will continue to identify improvement projects for the organization. 

Blackfeet Tribal Health

School and Community-Based Health Services for Blackfeet Youth

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $20,000

This grant allowed Blackfeet Tribal Health to plan for and establish a school-based clinic to serve students in Browning. During the grant, the tribe formed a successful collaboration with the school district, secured and renovated a building to house the clinic, and hired staff. In the fall of 2016, the new clinic (named the Southern Piegan School Health and Wellness Program) began seeing students. As of late 2017, the clinic had provided care to more than 1,500 students and was preparing to implement a new integrated behavioral health program. The clinic is fully self-sustaining through revenue from insurance billing and will not require grant support to maintain operations.

Blackfeet Tribal Health

Blackfeet Emergency Medical Services Program

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2019
Grant Amount: $75,136

The Blackfeet EMS Program trained and certified three paramedics from Blackfeet Tribal Health’s emergency medical technician staff. With the advanced certifications, the Blackfeet EMS Program is now able to bill at a higher rate and will continue to expand its program. Threvenue allowed the tribe to purchase three new ambulances with advanced equipmentwhich is helping the program to provide a higher level of service. By certifying their paramedic staff, the Blackfeet Tribe is addressing their workforce challenges and providing improved emergency response to the community. The program is sustainable through revenue generated from billing services 

 

Blackfeet Tribe

Centralized Third-Party Billing System

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $100,000

The Blackfeet Tribe created a centralized third-party billing office for their health system. The billing office allows the tribe to maximize revenue from the health services they provide and improve the financial management of revenue from third-party billing. The project hired a benefits coordinator and patient accounts coordinator to assess their current programs and identify billable services. The billing office collected over $2.5 million in revenue and provided referral services for Blackfeet Tribal Medicaid recipients for denture and brace services. The billing office is helping the tribe improve and expand health services to serve the needs of their community better and create a more fiscally stable, and sustainable structure for existing health programs. The office is sustainable through the revenue generated from billing services. 

Blackfeet Tribe

Blackfeet Partnership for Food Sovereignty Strategic Plan

Project Tem: 12 months; Ended 2019
Grant Amount: $50,000

The Blackfeet Agriculture Resource Management Plan (ARMP) completed comprehensive, five-year food sovereignty strategic plan and began implementation. The project’s long-term goal is to work towards ending food insecurity and many of the problems implicit in disconnecting from traditional food sources. Objectives for the planning process included coordination of food production and delivery systems on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, creation of a Blackfeet food code, and development of measurement tools to track potential health changes due to interventions in the food and health system. As part of this project, the ARMP team began implementing a feasibility study for a Blackfeet Beef/Bison Processing Plant. They also received a fiveyear, $1 million grant from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research that will underwrite all the research objectives outlined in the food sovereignty strategic plan. Key partners include the Blackfeet Tribe, community partners, and the MSU Native Land Project.   

Browning Alternative School

Using Blackfeet Cultural Values to Create a Trauma-Informed School Setting

Project Term: 18 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $15,000

The goal of this project was to create a trauma-informed school program by training staff in trauma-informed approaches to school discipline using Blackfeet cultural values. The Browning Alternative School developed trauma-informed teams and implemented culturally-adapted critical incident stress management training so that the community could respond sustainably to crisis situations. Teams were equipped to quickly respond to crises and provide support for trauma and grief. The project also implemented restorative justice practices into the school system to elevate student voices and developed training units for cultural and historical trauma with accompanying resiliency strategies and resources. The trauma-informed program began in the Browning Alternative School and then extended to the entire school district.

Center Pole

Oosha Itchik/Healthy Food System

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $50,000

Through this grant, Center Pole successfully created a model for community-based food sovereignty and a traditional and healthy foods hub. They trained youth through community internships in food sovereignty, exposed hundreds of community members to growing and eating natural foods, completed a community food assessment survey, and used the survey findings to further development of the healthy foods hub. Center Pole was chosen as one of eight “changemaker” organizations in the Pacific Northwest by Philanthropy Northwest, and Center Pole’s Executive Director Peggy Wellknown Buffalo received an award for long-term excellence working in Indian Country from the Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous Peoples.

Center Pole

Using All Parts of the Buffalo: Better Reservation Health through Food Rescue and Recovery

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021
Grant Amount: $100,000

Center Pole will collect fresh foods from Billings that are near expiration and distribute them to the Crow and Northern Cheyenne reservations. This collection and distribution will be done through a system created and implemented by the Center Pole’s community food interns. Funding will be used to pay the food interns and for transportation costs and storage as well as for Center Pole’s traditional food production. Partners for this project include Crow Abundance is Here, a local community collaboration whose member organizations include the National Center for Appropriate Technology, Plenty Doors, Messengers for Health, Crow Tribal Health, Little Big Horn College, the USDA, AmeriCorps, and Food Corps Montana. Other partners include the Crow and Northern Cheyenne elders and Billings Family Service. The goal of this project is to assist the Crow and Northern Cheyenne in healing themselves through food and creating a healthy sustainable food economy that is culturally relevant, reflects traditional values of reciprocity, self-sufficiency, team work, sharing, and zero waste and leads to better health and longer lives.

CSKT Tribal Health Department

Understanding and Utilizing Health Care Resources on the Flathead Indian Reservation

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $100,000

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal (CSKT) Health Department accomplished all objectives for this project. Through public law 638 they assumed the Indian Health Service budget for purchased and referred care and now manage the entirety of this program for the tribe. The grant funding allowed the CSKT Health Department to provide Medicaid and insurance outreach and enrollment services to clients of the Flathead reservations. Seven outreach events were held throughout the course of the project and enrollment in Medicaid and private insurance, employee plans, and marketplace plans continuously increased. Finally, CSKT trained providers and patients on the new coverage approach and on how to effectively use health care coverage.

Eagle Shield Center

Blackfeet Community Hospice Project

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $26,262

This planning project supported the establishment of a partnership among tribal agencies on the Blackfeet reservation who will collaborate toward developing hospice services for the community and provided a one-day workshop to educate the Blackfeet community about hospice and end-of-life care. Since 2007, Blackfeet community members and a researcher from Montana State University have been collaborating on end-of-life experiences among Blackfeet people using a participatory approach. The partnership includes the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council, the Eagle Shield Center, the Blackfeet Tribal Health Department, Tribal Planning, Blackfeet Community College, Blackfeet Family and Child Services, Indian Health Service, and the Tribal Diabetes Clinic. At the conclusion of this project, solid partnerships had been established; the workshop on available hospice services in the Blackfeet community increased the community’s knowledge of end-of-life care needs and services. Eagle Shield Center will continue to work towards establishing hospice services through the new partnerships and advisory committee.

Families First Children's Museum

Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribe Family Education Services

Project Term: 12 months; 2019-2020
Grant Amount: $26,118

The Families First Children’s Museum (FFCM) will provide family education classes and resources for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal (CSKT) community intended to foster healing and help develop resilient communities. The project will introduce new, relevant, and evidence-based curricula within three separate tracks: parents/caregivers, foster parents, and childcare providers. Funding will be used to hire native instructors and support curriculum development. Through current partnerships with CSKT, the Department of Human Resource Development, and Salish Kootenai College, as well as growth in collaboration with the Tribal Health Department, Tribal Education Department, local childcare providers, and organizations like the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, FFCM’s work will extend to reach more families and create connections between parent education skill development and a stronger family resource network.

Fort Belknap Tribal Health

Centralized Billing Capacity Building Project

Project Term: 24 months; 2017-2019
Grant Amount: $65,000

This project will help establish Fort Belknap’s centralized billing department by expanding the range of billable services and establishing internal controls to ensure legal compliance. The revenue generated will support prevention programs and help the tribe assume management of their behavioral health services from the Indian Health Service. Funding will also be used to hire a consultant to assess the revenue cycle process, controls and operations, and recommend specific improvements.

Fort Belknap Tribal Health

Diabetes Care Clinic

Project Term: 18 months; 2017-2019
Grant Amount: $90,000

This project will expand Fort Belknap’s current diabetes program by establishing a Diabetes Care Clinic to provide consistent, comprehensive, and culturally appropriate primary care to patients diagnosed with diabetes or prediabetes. The project will also create an independent, tribally-run health board to administer the clinic and provide a stable governing body to oversee its functions. Grant funding will be used to contract with a health system administrator to assist in developing the tribal health board and oversee the Diabetes Care Clinic and its supportive components. Partners include the Indian Health Service, and the Fort Belknap Tribal Health and Centralized Billing Departments.

Fort Peck Health Promotion Disease Prevention

Staff Recruitment and Telemedicine Systems Project

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $25,000

This project’s goal was to develop long-term, innovative solutions to the critical shortage of health providers on the Fort Peck Reservation. The project successfully developed formal agreements with Yale Children’s Psychiatric Center and Harvard to provided behavioral health services using telemedicine, and the MSU-Bozeman School of Nursing to send students as part of their curriculum to assist in school-based health centers. Recruiting relationships for health care professionals were also strengthened with Yale, Harvard, UM and Wala Wala. With the help of more effective recruitment and retention methods, Fort Peck HPDP is better equipped to bring quality health care to their community.

Fort Peck Tribal Health Department

Rapid HIV and HCV Testing Services

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $50,000

This project expanded Fort Peck’s current needle exchange program to provide testing services for HIV and hepatitis C (HCV). With 446 cases of HCV between 2011 and 2015, the HCV rates on Fort Peck are among the highest in the state and six times the national rate. HIV screenings were successfully provided at an annual community-wide screening (which was also available to non-Native community members), and the adult and juvenile correction facilities. In addition to providing screenings for injection drug users in the community, the project also successfully facilitated new collaborations with county and state health agencies including the tribal corrections facilities, the Roosevelt County Health Department, and Indian Health Services.

Fort Peck Tribal Health Department

Needle Exchange Program

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $50,000

This project revived the Needle Exchange Program that operated on the Fort Peck Reservation from the summer of 2009 to January 2012 and expanded it to provide injection drug users with clean needles, education, sharps containers for safe disposal of needles, and referrals to addictions counseling if needed. As one of the first and only needle exchange programs operated in a rural reservation in the US, Fort Peck’s employed a unique and successful protocol. The project’s main goal is to reduce the transmission of blood-borne illnesses such as hepatitis C and HIV. This program successfully now serves more than 200 clients on the Fort Peck Reservation and will be sustained indefinitely through a HRSA grant.

Hays Lodgepole School District 50

Fort Belknap Indian Community Homeless Youth Feasibility Study

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $49,000

For this project, the Hays-Lodgepole Public School and the Fort Belknap Indian Community Council assessed the feasibility of designing, constructing, operating, and facilitating housing and supportive services to improve health and education outcomes for homeless youth on the Fort Belknap Reservation. The project successfully created 15 new community partnerships bringing together tribal leadership, community members, and youth over the course of 10 planning meetings. The finalized feasibility study includes two site options for the youth shelter along with an overall floor and feasibility plan that will allow the tribal planners to seek funding for the second phase of the project which will involve the construction of the facility.

Helena Indian Alliance

Master Plan

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $25,000

This project resulted in the production of a preliminary architecture report that the organization will use as a guide for building renovations and for developing additional health services including dental and pharmacy. The report was also used it to seek funding for a Community Development Block Grant. Their project was not selected for block grant funding in 2018, however, they will continue looking for future opportunities.

Helena Indian Alliance

Development of Best Practices for Excellence in Opiate Dependence Treatment

Project Term: 18 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $20,000

This project created a best practice manual for the treatment of opioid use disorders utilizing medication-assisted treatment (MAT). The project successfully designed and implemented a registry for capturing the treatment data of individuals suffering from opiate and methamphetamine use disorders. The purpose of the data collection is to correlate treatment approaches with long-term outcomes. While there has been a tremendous increase in MAT for opiate and other substance use disorders, there remain many important open questions about the details of treatment over an extended period and the outcomes associated with differences in treatment approach. Registries such as this can become an important tool in determining answers and molding evolving therapy.

Helena Indian Alliance

Integrated Behavioral Health for Urban Indian Center

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021

Grant Amount: $150,000

Helena Indian Alliance will implement integrated behavioral health in their primary care clinic and behavioral health department. As part of this project, they will perform evidence-based screenings for behavioral health disorders in their primary care clinic, train their staff on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for substance use disorders (SBIRT). They will also implement integrated services and make referrals for behavioral health on the same day that a patient presents to the medical clinic. The warm handoff model will be used for primary care as well as behavioral health to ensure treatment for the whole person at each visit. Grant funds will be used for training and implementation of the project, hiring a care coordinator or behavioral health provider for the clinic, providing psychiatric consultation, and developing sustainability. The project’s goal is for the integrated behavioral health model to be a permanent and lasting resource in the clinic and community.

Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana

Montana Native American Girl Empowerment Project

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2019
Grant Amount: $15,000

The Little Shell Tribe assisted tribes and urban Indian health centers across the state to plan and implement girl-centered, protective asset programs, and to train mentors in each tribal community in Montana. The project focused on building ‘protective assets’ which are strengths and skills that can help young women stay safer, conquer crisis, and better plan for the future. The project hosted two well attended camps and several workshops and held group calls with representation from each tribe and urban Indian health center and trained mentors. The mentors will continue to work across the state through the Tribal Tobacco Prevention Program. The protective asset program expects to improve the self-confidence of Native American girls and provide skill building training that could lower the chances of experiencing adverse childhood experiences and improve school performance.

Messengers for Health

Traditional Relationships Improve Contemporary Health

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $50,000

For this project, Messengers for Health worked to broaden their cancer screening outreach program (which previously focused on women) to include colon cancer screening for men and implemented a culturally-based chronic illness self-management program. Messengers for Health is a non-profit organization on the Crow Indian Reservation and has been working in cancer screening since 1996, in partnership with Professor Suzanne Christopher at Montana State University, using a community-based participatory research framework. For the cancer screening outreach project, several Crow Indian men were successfully recruited and trained to serve as health advisors for their communities. These men helped spread the word about colorectal cancer awareness and the importance of early screening to prevent colon cancer. In addition, the chronic illness self-management project successfully began facilitating an intervention with their first group of participants. Participants attended sessions on topics including gaining a better understanding of chronic illness, promoting self-advocacy, and improving personal self-care. Antidotally, participants expressed benefits to their overall health due to the support group intervention activities. Both programs represent new areas of outreach and intervention for the Crow community.

Missoula Urban Indian Health Center

Walking Well with Traditional Healing

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $50,000

This project successfully increased the health center’s capacity to provide culturally adapted, evidence-based, and trauma-informed awareness to the over 500 active clients they see each year. Project accomplishments include providing historical trauma education sessions and Community Resiliency Model workshops to the Missoula community. Mending Broken Hearts, a grief support series, was provided to clients who reported a deeper understanding of historical and inter-generational trauma and were able to begin addressing the impact on their own lives. Finally, a trauma-informed organizational assessment was completed, and trauma-informed practices were incorporated into the diabetes prevention education series offered to teens and adults.

Missoula Urban Indian Health Center

Qua Qui Connection: The Circle of Good Medicine and Holistic Health

Project Term: 24 months; 2017-2019
Grant Amount: $150,000

This project will add primary care services to the current behavioral health and diabetes programming at Missoula Urban Indian Health Center (MUIHC). The addition of a primary care services will help MUIHC become a fully-functioning urban Indian health center that provides comprehensive, culturally appropriate care for one of the largest urban Indian populations in the state. Grant funding will be used to support a primary care provider to launch the medical clinic.

Mountain Shadow Association

Kaala’s Village Development Project

Project Term: 12 months; 2019-2020
Grant Amount: $50,000

Mountain Shadow Association (MSA) will move a planned family healing center on the Crow reservation (Kaala’s Village) from the feasibility study phase into the development phase. MSA will hire a supportive housing consultant to help them with the development. The project will be informed and guided by a community-based advisory board that will meet monthly to receive updates on the developer’s work plan progress and ensure that the project remains grounded in the values, needs, and vision of the community and remains focused on meeting the immediate integrated health care needs of local families. Grant funds will be used to convene the advisory board and contract with BeauxSimone Consulting to assist MSA and the advisory board in solidifying a development team, finalizing the concept plan, identifying a property management company, and securing additional funding for Kaala’s Village (‘Kaala’ is the Crow word for ‘grandmother’). Partners that are committed to participating in the advisory board include the Apsaalooke Nation Housing Authority, the City of Lodge Grass, Plenty Doors Community Develop Corps, the Casey Family Foundation, Big Horn Valley Health Center, Tribal Legislative Health and Human Services Committee, Tribal IQWA Coordinator, Indian Health Services, Lodge Grass Schools PTO, peer support specialists, USDA Rural Development, and Meadowlark Counseling. The grantee hopes to create a final conceptual model that can support a successful capital campaign and integrate appropriate partners, resulting in the full implementation of Kaala’s Village.

 

Mountain-Pacific Quality Health Foundation

Implementing Trauma-Informed Care

Project Term: 24 months; 2018-2020
Grant Amount: $98,284

For this project, Mountain-Pacific Quality Health will collaborate with the Billings Area Indian Health Service and service unit facilities in Montana to support the implementation of comprehensive approaches to trauma-informed care that effectively address trauma and its impact on American Indian and Alaska Native populations in Montana. Mountain-Pacific will also offer these services to tribal health departments and urban Indian centers at their specific request and as resources allow. Mountain-Pacific will provide project management services to facilitate the transformation to trauma-informed care, train staff on trauma-informed principles and approaches, design and track workflows for trauma screening, develop an emotionally safe environment, determine and ensure safeguards like compassion fatigue training to prevent secondary traumatic stress in staff, and foster partnerships for referral sources that can monitor and maintain the ongoing mental and emotional well-being of patients and staff.

MSU - Center for American Indian and Rural Health Equity

Responding to Secondary Trauma among American Indian Victim Service Providers

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $25,000

This project’s goal was to serve American Indian social service employees who support victims of domestic violence, elder abuse, child abuse and neglect, sexual assault, and other forms of trauma. As part of this project, a toolkit was successfully created to mitigate the effects of secondary trauma among social service providers. Secondary trauma is recognized as an occupational hazard that contributes to health problems and burnout among victim service providers. The community advisory board met two-dozen times over the course of the grant to evaluate project and ensure the toolkit’s cultural relevance. A training on how to use the toolkit, using a train-the-trainer model, was held with over 50 people in attendance. Following the initial training, the project team received six requests for additional trainings and those trainings are currently being planned. Quantitative data analysis showed that the training resulted in statistically significant increases in awareness, knowledge, and normalization of secondary trauma and a statistically significant increases in awareness of coping strategies to reduce the impacts of secondary trauma among American Indian service providers who were trained to use the toolkit. Organizations engaged in this project have expressed their desire to make organizational changes to reduce the impacts of secondary trauma.

North American Indian Alliance

Electronic Health Record and Revenue Cycle Optimization Project

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $15,000

This project helped optimize the North American Indian Alliance’s electronic health records and improved third-party revenue within the organization. The Helena Indian Alliance provided technical support in developing office procedures to ensure accountability, producing efficient managers capable of teaching staff, and building the correct measures to report progress. All of the clinical and behavioral health providers were successfully trained to use the new system and the organization is now able to successfully complete third-party billing.

North American Indian Alliance

Strategic Planning Initiative

Project Term: 12 months; 2017-2018
Grant Amount: $50,000

For this project, North American Indian Alliance (NAIA) will complete a needs assessment and strategic plan. This initiative will take place in two stages: first, a consultant will work with organizational leadership to create an interim plan to stabilize the organization by fall 2017; and second, NAIA will work with partner organizations including the county health department, hospital, and behavioral health providers to conduct an in-depth needs assessment and develop a more comprehensive strategic plan. The strategic plan will reveal current and potential service provision gaps and formulate a plan that addresses programming, operations, and financing. The goal is to stabilize the organization internally and build on the strengths of their current work while looking for ways to extend their services to the community.

Northern Cheyenne Tribal Board of Health

Injury Prevention Project

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $99,453

The grant allowed the tribe to establish the Northern Cheyenne Injury Prevention Program. The grantee formed a strong coalition and provided multiple car seat safety clinics, safety checks, seat belt law awareness, and data sharing. In a major success, the coalition provided data and advocacy that ultimately supported a decision by the Tribal Council to rescind the Secondary Seat Belt Ordinance and implement a Primary Seatbelt Ordinance in September 2018. The tribe is assessing options to fund ongoing injury prevention activities, including seeking federal injury prevention funding and possibly including this program in T-HIP Tier 2.

Northern Cheyenne Tribal Board of Health

Revenue Enhancement Project

Project Term: 18 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $75,000

This project helped the Cheyenne Board of Health increase the revenue they generate from clinical services, create a stronger patient registration process, and identify additional services that they are able to support through billing insurance. Grant funds were used to hire a new staff position to focus on insurance enrollment, and a consultant to help with revenue cycle management. They began coding and billing for clinical services in-house, which increased their third-party revenueTheir new patient registration process has helped patients and clients apply for other resources for their medical needs. At the end of this grant, the tribe had received over $750,000 in increased revenue that will be reinvested into the health system. The revenue increase has led to implementing spending policies to serve the needs of the community better 

Rocky Boy Health Board

Centralized Coding, Billing, and Revenue Maximization Project

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $99,608

The goal of this project was to develop a sound administration and stable revenue base, which would allow the tribe to design and run effective, tribally-led health programs. During the course of the project, eight tribal health employees completed a coding course through Stone Child College, one patient registration clerk and two benefits coordinators were hired, three staff completed Indian Health Service third-party billing and account management training, and two staff members attended the National Indian Health Service patient registration. One year after the completion of the grant, the grantee reported an overall increase of third-party revenue of over $2 million (52.74%). 

 

Salish Kootenai College

Type 2 Diabetes Intervention

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2019
Grant Amount: $75,000

Salish Kootenai College staff taught CSKT members about diabetes prevention during community events and increased the college’s capacity to teach students about chronic disease prevention. As part of the project, the college strengthened its relationship with the CSKT Tribal Health Department. For example, during the Women 4 Women Wellness Health Fair, college staff screened 77 women for diabetes, and they referred the 21% who screened positive to the CSKT Tribal Health Department for a follow-up. The college also used its grant funds to help promote its new Health Promotion Practices Program. This program trains students in chronic disease management and health promotion and will help build a pipeline of community health professionals in the tribe. Since the program started in 2019, eight students have enrolled and will graduate with an associate’s degree.

Salish Kootenai College

Four-Year Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree to Increase Native American Nurses in Montana

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021
Grant Amount: $100,000

This project will develop a four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing (BSN) at Salish Kootenai College (SKC). SKC’s mission is to provide quality education for Native American students so they can improve the lives of their families and the communities in which they live. The Indian Health Service (which only hires only BSN graduates), has hospitals and clinics on every reservation in Montana which means that BSN graduates will have a much better chance of finding employment opportunities in their own communities. Funding will be used to fund the staff time needed for development and implementation of the BSN program. The goal of this project is to graduate BSN students, particularly Native Americans, who can return to their home communities and reservations to decrease health disparities through the provision of culturally congruent care.

Special Olympics Montana

Insurance Enrollment, Health Screenings, and Follow-Up Care for Special Olympics Athletes

Project Term: 24 months; Ended 2018
Grant Amount: $20,000

For this project, Special Olympics Montana (SOMT) partnered with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribal (CSKT) Health Department, and the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services to work towards improving health for those with intellectual disability on the Flathead Reservation. Grant funds allowed for outreach, enrollment, and engagement by SOMT with the CSKT Health Department and other tribal communities. A SOMT tribal outreach director worked in the CSKT Health Department to identify potential CSKT Special Olympics athletes, involve them in SOMT, and facilitate participation in SOMT-required health screenings. CSKT Health Department staff will assisted with insurance enrollment, billed insurance for care received, and ensured robust coordination of care among all each individual’s health providers. The project successfully established relationships among the partners, and outreach and events to identify and engage potential Special Olympic athletes will continue as a result of this project.

Two Eagle River School

Two Eagle River School Wellness Project

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2019
Grant Amount: $50,000

Two Eagle River School partnered with Freedom Lodge and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) Tribal Health Department to bring a licensed mental health counselor into the school to provide behavioral health services to the students. Two Eagle River School is a tribal alternative middle and high school serving 110 students on the Flathead Reservation. After multiple suicides in the community over the year before the grant, the school identified an immediate need to address the mental health and historical trauma needs of the students. The project helped equip students and staff with tools and knowledge to address trauma. They are now providing prevention services and CSKT has applied for a grant to support the behavioral health position within the school for the next five years.

 

 

 

UM - ORSP

Assessing Access to Asthma Education Services

Project Term: 12 months; Ended 2017
Grant Amount: $25,000

For this project, the Pharmacist Managed Asthma Clinics Program at the University of Montana-Skaggs School of Pharmacy assessed current access to asthma self-management education and determined the feasibility of multi-disciplinary, pharmacist-led managed asthma care in Montana’s American Indian communities. Survey and focus group results found that there is indeed a need for asthma self-management education in American Indian communities and health care professionals in Rocky Boy and Missoula Urban Indian Health Center expressed interest in becoming certified asthma educators. A toolkit for health care professionals was successfully developed providing statistics, educator benefits, patient and practitioner resources, and guidance for billing insurance.

University of Montana

Improving Access, Training, and Recruitment for American Indian Health Care

Project Term: 24 months; 2019-2021
Grant Amount: $97,359

The University of Montana will work to improve care for American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) in Montana by increasing cultural awareness among medical students and improving access to care for specific medical services. Medical residents and health professions students at the Family Medicine Residency of Western Montana and the University of Montana will learn cultural humility through the development of a didactic curriculum for both learners and practicing professionals, as well as an immersion clinical experience at the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) Tribal Health. The clinical experience will enhance cultural training and allow active recruitment of residents and students to work in AI/AN health care upon graduation. This project will also development models for new services to be provided by resident and faculty physicians at CSKT Tribal Health, beginning with maternal and obstetrical care. New services will help to address current barriers to care experienced by Tribal Health recipients. Grant funds will help develop curricula, provide resources for the creation of new models of care, and improve and expand the clinical training opportunities in AI/AN settings. This will help meet the overall goal of improving care for one of Montana’s largest underserved populations.

University of Montana Foundation

American Indian Governance and Policy Institute

Dates: 2020-2022
Grant Amount: $99,956

The University of Montana’s American Indian Governance and Policy Institute (AIGPI) will develop a comprehensive tribal public policy needs assessment. The assessment will inform AIGPI’s tribal policy research and analysis agenda for the next ten years. AIGPI’s mission is to coalesce the research and service resources available within the Montana University System and work with tribes to address core causes of poor socioeconomic conditions and health on Montana reservations. This work will be achieved by enhancing tribal governing structures through tribal-level policy changes to improve government function, strengthening regulatory authority, and supporting self-governance. AIGPI will provide tribal policymakers with a critical service consisting of credible, in-depth research and analysis to further tribal leader’s efforts to strengthen reservation economies and build community and individual health and prosperity. Partners will include Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council and representatives from each Montana Tribe. Grant funds will be used to support the time, effort, travel, and meeting costs for AIGPI’s director to conduct outreach, data collection, data analysis, and convening an advisory committee.