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Priority: Medicaid Expansion

GWU Memo: Comments on Ending Continuous Eligibility

Researchers at George Washington University submitted this memo in response to Montana’s request for public comments on its draft amendments to the Medicaid HELP (also known as Medicaid expansion) and WASP (Montana’s Waiver for Additional Services and Populations) waivers. Their findings estimate that ending 12-month continuous eligibility would reduce the enrollment periods of about 21,500 … Continued

Medicaid in Montana: The Critical Role of Medicaid Expansion in Supporting Montana’s Behavioral Health System

This report shows how much progress has been made to improve behavioral health since Montana implemented Medicaid expansion in 2016. With Medicaid expansion now providing a payment source for behavioral health services, Montana’s system is in the process of a deeply needed transformation. Between 2016 and 2020, Montana’s budget for prevention doubled, and 59% of … Continued

Analysis of Montana SB 100 and Policies to Limit Medicaid 12-Month Continuous Eligibility

Senate Bill 100 is currently under consideration by the Montana Legislature. The bill proposes increasing how often the state verifies the eligibility of recipients to receive benefits under Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). To better understand how these changes might affect the health of people currently on the program, we spoke with … Continued

Montana Medicaid: Improving Health in Montana

This one-pager pulls the most important findings on how Montana’s Medicaid program is improving health in the state from Medicaid in Montana and Economic Effects of Medicaid Expansion in Montana.

Montana Medicaid Expansion: Strengthening Montana’s Economy

This one-pager pulls the most important findings on how Montana’s Medicaid expansion program is strengthening the economy from Medicaid in Montana and the Economic Effects of Medicaid Expansion in Montana.

Medicaid in Montana: How Medicaid Affects Montana’s State Budget, Economy, and Health

This report provides an in-depth analysis of Montana’s Medicaid program, its beneficiaries and costs, and how it affects the health system and health outcomes of Montanans. Montana Medicaid covers 265,000 children and adults with low incomes, two-thirds of whom live in rural Montana. The report provides data on Medicaid’s role in Montana’s health system and … Continued

Economic Effects of Medicaid Expansion in Montana

This report looks at the economic impact of Medicaid expansion in Montana. It finds that Montana’s Medicaid expansion introduces $650 million into the economy each year, supporting 6,000 new jobs and $400 million in personal income. Although Montana pays for a share of this coverage, the program’s savings and the revenue generated by increased economic … Continued

Individual Market Stabilization (Medicaid Expansion Analysis)

This report finds that Montana’s Medicaid expansion had a significant impact on the insurance market, resulting in an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 people shifting from the individual market to the Medicaid program, and likely resulting in lower premiums on the individual market. According to the report, ending Medicaid expansion could result in 2020 premium increases … Continued

Medicaid Expansion Work Requirements (HB658 Analysis)

This report found that as many as 50,000 to 56,000 low-income people in Montana could lose health coverage under HB658 (introduced on Mar 12, 2019) to reauthorize Montana’s Medicaid expansion and impose new work and reporting requirements on recipients. The new report updates a previous in-depth analysis released on Feb 13, 2019, that looked at … Continued

Medicaid Expansion Work Requirements (MeRIA Analysis)

This report found that an estimated 26,000 to 36,000 low-income people in Montana would lose much-needed health coverage under a proposed bill to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients. Also, 5,000 to 7,000 more could lose health coverage due to higher premiums. The report was commissioned by MHCF, completed by researchers at George Washington University’s … Continued